Rosalind Krauss “The Grid”

Rosalind Krauss “The Grid”

Whilst talking to Amanda about my paperclip piece for the third exhibition she suggested that I take a look at Rosalind Krauss and her views on “The Grid”. I found the text really interesting and enlightening, I had no idea of all the instances of “Grids” in art and the everyday. Grids in the everyday is something I wish to explore in my drawing project which focuses on repetition and pattern. Krauss talks about the grid as a symbol of modernism “…lowering the barriers between the arts of vision and those of language.” The Modernist practice of art generates many instances of grids. There are obvious instances, in work like Piet Mondrian “Composition 2″(1930) to some subtle instances of grids like seen in David Casper Friedrich “View From Painters Studio” (1818).

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Piet Mondrian “Composition 2″(1930)

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David Casper Friedrich “View From Painters Studio” (1818)

Krauss believes that there are two ways in which the grid functions to declare the modern nature of modern art. Spatial and Temporal. When it comes to spatial the grid identifies the freedom and independence of the previously considered confined and restricted dimensions of art, and the world of art. The flat, repetitive, ordered and constructed grid represents the confines of art and the ability to alter, break from or reinterpret the grid is what modernist art is all about the break with convention. “The grid crowds out the dimensions of the real and replaces them with the lateral spread of a singular surface.”

In the temporal sense the grid is an emblem of modernity. The grid is a form that is everywhere in the art of our century.

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